Mexico City’s lawmakers are urging the federal government to take action to ban Donald Trump after they unanimously voted to stop him entering the country.

The proposal passed unanimously on Wednesday, according to Deputy José Manuel Delgadillo of the conservative National Action Party. He described the document, known as a “point of agreement,” as a largely symbolic recommendation to the federal government that the local legislature lacked the ability to enforce.

Jose Manuel Delgadillo, National Action Party deputy, said Mexico City’s assembly wanted to encourage the country’s president, Enrique Pena Nieto, to confront Mr Trump about his beliefs.

“What we’re saying is that if he wants to build a wall so that Mexicans can’t enter his country, the he is not welcome in our country” Jose Manuel Delgadillo said.

Donald Trump, the billionaire entrepreneur has pledged to build a “great, great wall” between the US and Mexico if he wins the race to the White House, which he said would have to be funded by Mexico.

The 69-year-old has said he believes the country is “sending people that have lots of problems, and they are bringing those problems to us. They are bringing drugs, and bringing crime, and their rapists”.

Deputy Víctor Hugo Romo of the leftwing Revolutionary Democratic Party, which introduced the point of agreement, referred to Trump as “primeval, egocentric and primitive,” before going on to compare Trump to Hitler in public remarks Wednesday, according to MSV Noticias.

“Hitler was very popular,” Romo said. “He generated a lot of sympathy by adopting nationalist politics that vindicated the Germans’ sense of self-worth. [Trump] is practically a copy. I consider Donald Trump a chauvinist, a misogynist who fosters and leans towards toward repression. … He doesn’t respect diversity.”

But Peña Nieto, of the Revolutionary Institutional Party, has taken a more cautious approach. He’s largely refrained from publicly criticizing the Republican front-runner, and his chief of staff Francisco Guzmán played down concerns about a Trump presidency on Tuesday — though he avoided mentioning Trump by name.

“Anyone who becomes president of the United States will have to work with Mexico,” Guzmán said, according to Bloomberg News. “It would be difficult to reverse 20 years of integration.”