Sydney (Press Release): A Peppa Pig chainsaw, a Pikachu wand and an archery set are some of the dangerous toys that have failed Fair Trading’s 2018 Christmas toy compliance blitz.

Minister for Better Regulation Matt Kean said Fair Trading investigators trawled through more than 560 stores around the State and found 24 toys that are not safe for Santa to leave under the Christmas tree this year.

“Most of the dangerous toys, like the Peppa Pig chainsaw, failed testing because the battery compartment isn’t secured, or they have small parts that can fall off,” Mr Kean said.

“The archery set failed because projectiles are required to have labels warning users not to point the toy at people’s eyes, but this one doesn’t.

“These toys might look fun and innocent, but loose batteries, projectiles and choking hazards can injure or even kill small children.

“That’s why our Fair Trading inspectors have been out on the beat inspecting toys and ordering dodgy products off the shelves around NSW. We don’t want to see any tragedies this Christmas.”

A dangerous decorative wreath was also discovered during the compliance operation. Fair Trading testing confirmed the product is highly flammable and the trader stocking the wreath has cooperated with the ACCC to voluntarily recall the product.

“This wreath has four candles sitting amongst some fake foliage. While it looks appealing on a Christmas lunch table, we found the wreath can ignite within seconds,” Mr Kean said.

“This is a major product safety failure and could cause a house fire or have deadly consequences if left unattended. I’m pleased to see the trader is offering refunds to consumers who may have unwittingly bought this dangerous product.”

Fair Trading will prosecute where appropriate against traders selling unsafe products in the lead up to Christmas. Under Australian Consumer Law, the maximum fine for individuals caught selling dangerous toys is $500,000, while companies can be fined up to $10 million.

Consumers who have purchased a non-compliant or dangerous toy are entitled to a refund of the purchase price. If they decide not to seek a refund, they should safely dispose of the toy immediately. Visit www.fairtrading.nsw.gov.au for more information.

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