It’s unclear if the anti-Brexit protests will affect the results of Thursday’s referendum, but a petition demanding a do-over vote has garnered more than 32 million signatures

Just days after voting to leave the European Union, more than 3 million Britons and UK residents have signed a petition calling for a second vote, forcing lawmakers to at least consider a debate on the issue.

Anti-Brexit protests broke out on the streets of London after a petition for a second EU referendum attracted 3 million signatures within a day.

British parliament is obliged to consider any petition posted on its website that amasses more than 100,000 signatures. The petition demands the Government re-stage the referendum because the winning vote for Leave was less than 60 per cent and was based on a turnout of less than 75 per cent.

A large majority — an estimated 75 percent — of voters age 18 to 24 reported voting in favor of remaining in the EU, according to a YouGov poll.

The petition for a second EU referendum was set up by William Oliver Healey who wrote: “We the undersigned call upon HM government to implement a rule that if the remain or leave vote is less than 60% based on a turnout less than 75%, there should be another referendum.”

The result revealed stark divisions between young and old, north and south, cities and rural areas, and university-educated people and those with fewer qualifications.

Demonstrators waved EU flags, held posters saying ‘Yes 2 EU’ and banners claiming the older population ‘stole our future’.

Demonstrators waved EU flags, held posters saying 'Yes 2 EU' and banners claiming the older population had 'stole our future'

Demonstrators waved EU flags, held posters saying ‘Yes 2 EU’ and banners claiming the older population had ‘stole our future’

The protests came despite a record 33.5million people taking part in the referendum – the highest in any election since 1992 – in which Leave won with 51.9 per cent, a margin of 1,269,501 votes.

It’s unclear how, or if, the anti-Brexit protests continuing to pop up throughout the United Kingdom will affect the results of Thursday’s referendum, but a petition demanding a do-over vote has garnered more than 2 million signatures in roughly two days and is reportedly slated for discussion in the House of Commons.

Anti-Brexit protests in the United Kingdom

Anti-Brexit protests broke out on the streets of London after a petition for a second EU referendum attracted 2million signatures within a day.

The protests came despite a record 33.5 million people taking part in the referendum – the highest in any election since 1992 – in which Leave won with 51.9 per cent, a margin of 1,269,501 votes.

In a historic vote Thursday, Britain decided to leave the European Union and those unhappy with the referendum’s results have taken to the streets in protest.

In Edinburgh, demonstrators protesting the anti-immigration rhetoric of the Leave campaign chanted, “Migrants are welcome here,” as they marched down Royal Mile on Friday carrying banners declaring “solidarity with migrants” in the city’s Old Town district. In Glasgow, more than 300 gathered Friday in George Square to protest the results of the Brexit referendum and what they called the “xenophobic hyperbole” kicked up the Leave camp.

More than 3 million sign British petition for new EU referendum

More than 3 million sign British petition for new EU referendum

#ScotLond: Remain supporters launch online campaign for Scotland and London

Online campaigners are urging to join together and stay in the EU as they both voted against Brexit.

Depressed Londoners are using the hashtag #ScotLand as part of a campaign for the capital to join Nicola Sturgeon’s battle for independence from the UK. London and Scotland voted to stay in the EU yesterday but a huge revolt by Middle England and Wales led to today’s Brexit.

SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon today said she could call a new independence referendum within months – because thirds of Scottish voters backed staying in the EU yesterday.

Anti-Brexit protests were also held in other UK cities, including Edinburgh, where Remain won by a vast majority

Anti-Brexit protests were also held in other UK cities, including Edinburgh, where Remain won by a vast majority