Tens of thousands of protesters have marched through Australian capital cities to urge world leaders to take action on climate change ahead of a United Nations summit.

Climate change rallies rolled on across Australia on Sunday, following well-attended protests in Melbourne on Friday and Darwin and Brisbane on Saturday.

On Sunday, it was the turn of Sydney, Canberra, Adelaide, Hobart and Perth.

Some of the signs read “There is no Planet B” and “Climate change is poverty”.

Doctors, firefighters, Aboriginal elders, religious leaders and young families were among the crowds calling on governments to keep temperatures from rising by more than two degrees Celsius.

Organisers said 45,000 people attended the rally, which began in The Domain before a march down Macquarie Street to the Opera House, following speeches and performances calling on those at the Paris climate summit to shift more rapidly to renewable energy.

Climate scientist Tim Flannery and Lord Mayor of Sydney Clover Moore spoke at the event, as well as Labor deputy leader Tanya Plibersek.

Sydney

Sydney march organiser Reece Proudfoot said those taking part in the Australian marches will walk in solidarity with millions of people across the world as part of the global campaign.

“People from all walks of life are calling for real action on climate change because current targets set by the government are way too low and are leaving Australia at the back of the pack,” Mr Proudfoot said.

“It’s now clear that a strong people-powered movement is calling for change and won’t stand for anything less than solid action on climate change.”

Mr Proudfoot welcomed Labor’s pledge on Friday to cut carbon emissions by 45 per cent on 2005 levels by 2030, which is well above the coalition pledge of between 26 and 28 per cent.

In Sydney, deputy federal Opposition leader Tanya Plibersek accused the prime minister of hypocrisy for lecturing other countries about climate change ahead of the conference.

“Malcolm Turnbull is going to Paris with Tony Abbott’s policies,” she told reporters.

“He’s stopped on the way (in Malta) to lecture other leaders on doing more, when we’re actually doing less.” Federal Labor MP Gai Brotmann said in Canberra that people were sending a strong message to the Turnbull government.

Sydney Climate Rally - climate march leaders in the Domain. Photo: Deborah Snow

Sydney Climate Rally – climate march leaders in the Domain. Photo: Deborah Snow

Perth

Among the speakers in Perth was United Firefighters Union of Australia WA branch president Kevin Jolly, who said bushfire seasons were starting earlier and there were not enough resources to match the risks.

“The issues we have faced in WA are global issues,” he said. Mr Jolly said firefighter numbers needed to double.

“There is a saying in our industry, `there are no sceptics on the end of a fire hose’,” he said.

Anglican Bishop Tom Wilmot and WA Islamic Council president Dr Rateb Jneid were singing from a similar hymn book, stressing that humans were responsible for the health of the planet.

Climate change supporters during the People's Climate March held in Sydney, Sunday, November 29

Climate change supporters during the People’s Climate March held in Sydney, Sunday, November 29

Canberra

Thousands of Canberrans have joined a worldwide protest by marching to support action on climate change.

They gathered on the front lawn of parliament house, a broad cross-section of people from Labor and the Greens to the fireman’s union, bee keepers, the Grim Reaper and Tibetan cows – pantomime-style cows that is.

“We are unstoppable, another world is possible,” was the chant as the march – estimated by organisers to be as many as 6000 people – set off.

Federal Labor ACT MP Gai Brotmann said people were sending a strong message to the Turnbull government.

“Action is required on climate, credible action and direction action is not that,” Ms Brotmann told AAP.

Many of the thousands of marchers who took part in events over the weekend carried signs during the protests

Many of the thousands of marchers who took part in events over the weekend carried signs during the protests

Melbourne

More than 40,000 people marched in Melbourne’s central business district on Friday to kick off the weekend of climate marches, with dozens of events also taking place in regional towns across the country.

Based on reporting by The Australian, SMH, SBS, Guardian, AAP and AFP